Lycian Way — Olympos to Adrasan

March 28, 2015

Last night it was raining, at times heavily enough to wake us up. The weather forecast for today was predicting more rain, but as we ate our breakfast the skies started to clear. The plan for today was to be driven to Olympos and then to walk back along the Lycian Way to Adrasan. Four of the more gung-ho Scottish women were also doing the walk, so the six of us headed off in the van to the trailhead.

Road washed out in Olympos

Road washed out in Olympos

When we arrived in Olympos our way was blocked because the road was washed out, so Jon dropped us off and gave us instructions on how to get down the river to the trailhead. Again we had to cross the river, so we donned our not-so-stylish plastic shoes and waded across. Today the water was deeper and faster, but only knee-deep still. After putting our walking shoes back on we started climbing the trail, stopping for a bit to check out a tomb near the trail.

Arbutus trees

Arbutus trees

Because of last night’s rain the bushes were all wet, so our shirts kept getting wet as well. But fortunately the weather was really good, so they kept drying out. It was a pleasant hike up through the woods, especially with the arbutus trees (locally called “strawberry trees”) and their brightly-coloured bark. In the burned-over area near the top we met three German hikers coming the other way, and they told us that the shepherd’s hut which was our targeted lunch spot was now the site of a café offering tea for ₺5 per glass. They thought that was rather expensive, and rightly so because tea is usually more like ₺2 per glass.

How to brew tea in Turkey

How to brew tea in Turkey

It took us about three hours to reach the saddle from Olympos, and the shepherd’s hut was just beyond that. Sure enough there was a Turkish man selling tea, coffee, orange juice, cookies, and so on. Quite a good business he had there! We decided that our budget could cover two cups of tea, but Jon later called the price a “rip-off”. The owner only knew about ten words of English and we couldn’t understand almost anything he said, but he did have a canvas tarp to keep the wind off us.

Tea at shepherd’s hut

Tea at shepherd’s hut

View from shepherd’s hut

View from shepherd’s hut

After lunch we carried on down the descent towards Adrasan, which was quite straightforward. Jon had given us some instructions this morning about how to avoid a river crossing, but at this point we couldn’t figure out what river they applied to or where we were supposed to deviate from the Lycian Way waymarks. So we followed the waymarks, hoping that things would become clear. On the way down we found a tortoise on the path, and it generously allowed us to take its picture.

Tortoise

Tortoise

When we got down to the flatlands it was still sunny, defying the weather forecast. We decided that this was where Jon’s river-avoidance instructions would apply. So, thinking we knew what we were doing, we followed the instructions on our plastic card and walked through a lot of greenhouses until we reached the river. Here we wandered around for a while until we were convinced we were off course. So Paul called Jon again, and he told us where we had gone wrong, so we backtracked. At this point we met the Scottish women, so we joined forces to try and figure out what road we should be taking.

Arum flower

Arum flower

We tried a different path, and found ourselves going through a different set of greenhouses but arriving on the bank of the same river. Another call to Jon, who by this time was walking to meet us. He took us to where we had gone wrong (we should have deviated left and not right) and we all walked to where he had parked the car. It wasn’t very far into Adrasan from there, so we all decided to finish off the walk properly. As we walked along the beach road into the village we saw a group of Hoopoes in a garden. That was a species which we had expected to see, but unfortunately they were very skittish and we couldn’t get a good photograph of them.

Boats docked for the winter

Boats docked for the winter

Back at the hotel we both had showers and then went downstairs, where we had drinks before dinner. Tonight’s main course was fish shish kebab with chips and salad, and it was really tasty. We hadn’t seen that on any Turkish menus yet, but that’s probably because you need expensive fish like swordfish to make it work. After dinner we sat and chatted with the Scottish women for quite a while.

Next: Walk to Sazak Bay

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